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617 Congress Ave
Austin, TX 78701 Map

(512) H-I-D-E-O-U-T

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August, 2010

Student Stories: Kathleen Nacozy (Level 4)

The Hideout teaches five levels of improv classes, and we thought it might be illuminating for you to hear from the students in their own words.

Here’s Kathleen Nakozy, a current level 4 student:

I began improv thinking I was a funny person. But in Level 1 improv class, I quickly realized that I’m not funny. I was discouraged after the first few classes. I watched my teacher’s troupe perform and thought, “These people are funny. I can’t do that because, as it turns out, I’m not funny.”

I kept at it and moved on to Level 2 because classes at the Hideout were so fun. Then I moved on to Level 3 and Level 4. Somewhere in there, I had a second revelation — trying to be funny isn’t the point. The point is not trying to do anything, to lose your ego and just be up there, improvising.

It’s not that great improvisers are naturally funny. People just look funny when they don’t know what the hell they’re doing. And I think the more you get into it, the funnier you look.

But, I may be over-thinking it.

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Student Stories: Andrew Pish (Level 4)

The Hideout teaches five levels of improv classes, with a new level one class starting every month. With that many students coming through our doors, it’s safe to say that teaching is as big a part of our theater as our shows. So we thought it might be illuminating for you to hear from the students in their own words.

Here’s Andrew Pish, a current level 4 student. Andrew just started playing in Maestro not too long ago, getting a first taste of what it’s like to take all the stuff he’s learned and use it on stage.

Last summer, I was sitting at my desk during a summer internship, hoping for something, anything to come along and sweep me up from the monotony of my 9 to 5. That’s when I saw an ad on google for comedy classes in Austin, “the Hideout Theater! Take a level one improv class, it’s never too late to take a risk” and I thought to myself, “I’ve always thought about doing comedy, so why don’t I try something new?” At the time, I was a Junior engineering student at UT, and I was bogged down in numbers, equations, and physics theorems that made no sense (they still don’t). So I thought it would be a good opportunity to try something I’d never really done before, and even though I had never acted or performed on stage in any way, I signed up.

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